Agriculture and Farming

Business Checklist

Business Checklist

Due Diligence Checklist

Due Diligence Checklist

Article and tips on marketing

Article and tips on marketing

How to set up a non profit

How to set up a non profit

Screening test for startup

Screening test for startup

How to look at costs

How to look at costs

The selection of a business entity (form) will affect your exposure to personal liability, how you draw profits and pay taxes, your ability to raise capital, how you run your business, and how difficult it is for business reporting.

Generally, all businesses fall into one of these broad categories: Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, Limited Liability Corporation, or Corporation.

A sole proprietorship is an unincorporated business owned by one individual. A partnership is a legal entity existing between two or more persons who join to carry on a trade or business.

If financial problems have overwhelmed your finances, Bankruptcy may be an option.  Read some of the basics here.

http:// http://www.nhbar.org/for-the-public/bankruptypamphlet.asp

CORE Foods Success With SCORE

Corey Rennell worked with a business mentor at SF SCORE and developed a fresh nutrition bar for extreme athletes. CORE food bars are a growing hit with Olympic athletes, outdoorsmen and fitness buffs in Northern California and the business is expanding at a sustainable pace.

Corey’s product idea came from necessity:
“As a young mountaineer, I was invited by the BBC & Discovery Channels to travel around the world with five other athletes, subsisting and practicing tribal sports with 12 different indigenous peoples,” he says. To get into shape for this incredible, 14-month challenge, the 2008 Harvard University natural science graduate combined his interest in nutritional science research with observations of tribal diets. He built what he calls the CORE Meal: a truly fresh, portable nutrition bar. It did the trick. When he returned, Corey made bars for other athletes, friends and family. When he could no longer keep up with demand, Corey began to consider leaving his day-job to pursue his passion.


Corey now sells two different bars for different kinds of athletes, and his young company is thriving. The bars are sold at Whole Foods stores in Northern California and Reno, Nevada, as well as through the company’s website www.corefoods.com.
 

In the coming year, Corey plans to offer new varieties of his bars and to build relationships to bring his product to retailers up and down the West Coast. Corey credits the team at Whole Foods Potrero Hill and the Local Producer Loan Program, family and friends as integral to his success. Corey’s business philosophy is inspired by the “sense of community” of the tribes he lived with--“Everyone worked for the well being of everyone. “ He shares those values through his not-for-profit model--including donating all company profits, maintaining a zero carbon footprint, and working with local, organic producers.

For more information info@corefoods.com

See video
Owner/Founder
Corey Rennell
My Location
info@corefoods.com
San Francisco CA 94103
United States
Employees
3
My Successes

 

 

What's Great About My Mentor?

“Richard Fivis was exactly what I needed in a counselor --receptive and supportive, but also straightforward and to the point, “ Corey recalls. “He said my goals were absolutely achievable, but I needed a business plan --something to solidify my many ideas and inspirations into one clear vision.“ Corey spent 6-9 months on his business plan and financial projections and Fivis provided critical direction: “At key junctures I needed someone who had been through it all before to help me focus my efforts properly and prioritize my time, “ says Corey. 

How SCORE Helped

Corey contacted San Francisco SCORE Chapter 10, and began working with counselor Richard Fivis to develop a fresh-bar production method.

Corey continues working with Richard Fivis and others at SF Score “as we venture into uncharted territory.”
   

Education

Corey’s advice to new entrepreneurs:
1. Get an SBA/SCORE counselor.
2. Develop a business plan.
3. Study the existing logistical networks for your product fulfillment carefully.
4. Develop conservative financial projections and make sure you price at a good multiple
5. Build your own salary into your financial projections.
6. Assume everything's been tried before. Get advice, advice, advice!!

He continues working with Richard Fivis and others at SF Score “as we venture into uncharted territory.”

SCORE Mentors Virginia Horse Journal to Success

When Dean and Darlene Jacobson moved from Philadelphia, PA, to Charlottesville, VA, they were anxious to become involved in Virginia's horse community. They searched for a local horse publication that included information about upcoming events, classified ads and horse news. When they couldn't find such a publication, the Jacobson's set out to create it themselves.

Owner/Founder
Dean and Darlene Jacobson
My Location
Charlottesville VA
United States
Employees
2
Year Company Formed
1995
My Successes

Motivated by their love of horses, they began to write the Virginia Horse Journal, a pamphlet-sized publication of about 20 pages, from their home. Without prior publishing experience, they struggled to produce two issues and then reevaluated their enterprise. Darlene thought that there must be someone with experience who would be willing to help them avoid the common pitfalls. A friend suggested SCORE.

In just three years, Virginia Horse Journal has grown to 80 pages of content. The Journal's 30,000 readers find it informative, as well as personable and entertaining. It is available for free in more than 500 locations throughout Virginia, North Carolina, West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania and over 1,000 loyal readers subscribe to the publication. This year's revenue is expected to top $100,000. The Jacobsons have also developed a Web site that posts current horse news, events and classified ads (www.virginiahorse.com). The site has gotten 58,000 hits since February.

Experiencing great success today, the Jacobson's have not had much time to rest lately. Last year, they were named the Official Horse Publication of the Virginia Horse Council and the Virginia Horse Industry Board. They still meet with their SCORE mentors frequently, about every six weeks or when a problem arises. "They keep us in line. Sometimes we are scared to move forward and make a decision, but we are more scared to not listen to them…they are always right about everything!"

Virginia Horse Journal continues to gallop along, having gone from a bimonthly to monthly publication, which means more income for the Jacobsens. "We've also added a Web site and received a grant to do a directory of the state horse industry," adds Darlene. "Things couldn't be going better."

There have been a few changes, such as a move to Northern Virginia. But the Jacobsens have already made contact with the local SCORE chapter. "There are a lot of things that we want to talk about, such as adding new products, making our Web site more productive and dealing with potential competition," says Darlene.

What's Great About My Mentor?

Darlene and Dean met with SCORE mentors Reg Hubley and Arlene Anns, both former McGraw-Hill publishing executives. "It was like an angel was watching out for us. We knew nothing about publishing—we couldn't have found two more perfect people." They met with Arlene and Reg frequently to work on editorial improvements and format and layout changes. They would also speak on the phone whenever something important came up. Twice a month, when the issues were ready to go to the printer, the Jacobsons would invite Arlene and Reg to their house for lunch and they would spend the entire afternoon going over the proof and revising the layout for the magazine.

Reg and Arlene also offered advice on circulation and advertising sales. To develop a circulation base, the Jacobsons began delivering copies of the journal to local retail horse businesses, such as tack and feed stores. Dean sent more than 100 letters to advertisers and received an overwhelming response. The Journal offered an ideal forum for retail horse businesses and horse owners to exchange information about the trade.

How SCORE Helped

Specific industry expertise made SCORE a valuable resource to the Jacobsons. Both Reg and Arlene were able to assist the budding publishers with developing rate schedules, ad sales strategies and plans for how to balance the volume of editorial and advertising content in the publication. As a niche publication, the Jacobsons' SCORE mentors provided solid information on how to make a very targeted publication a profitable business venture.

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