Nonprofit, Public and Professional Organizations

Regis Rulifson

Regis Rulifson

Current City: Morrisville, NC
Chapter: Raleigh SCORE

Completed a 36-year career with John Deere, retiring in 2014.  Over the course of my career with Deere, I participated in the development and growth of a start-up health management company, created new business and product segments within the health care and equipment business units, developed and led strategic planning and business growth efforts and led the divestiture of several business units.

Resume

Education

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2002&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; University of Chicago, Graduate School of Business, Executive Program in Corporate Strategy</p>

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1999&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Stanford University, Graduate School of Business, Financial Program for Executives</p>

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1986&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; University of Iowa, M.B.A.</p>

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1976&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Iowa State University, B.S., Computer Science</p>

Shelby Handley

Shelby Handley

Current City: Columbus, GA
Chapter: SCORE Columbus

Resume

Nathanusoro Friday Idio

Nathanusoro Friday Idio

Current City: Chambersburg, PA
Chapter: Hagerstown SCORE

Resume

Thomas E Pease

Thomas E Pease

Current City: Carmel, NY

Partner in a Professional Engineering firm for 25 years. Developed site services for the firm, including marketing,and planning. As an environmental engineer, developed innovative analyses of environmental impacts.  Interpreted technical requirements of regulations and permitting.  Testified in numerous federal and state cases relating to contamination issues.  I continue to serve as Quality Control and Quality Assurance engineer for projects.

Served on several boards of non-profits, including as president, secretary, grant writer (successful), and preparer of annual reports.

Resume

Education

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&lt;p&gt; Bachelors degree in Physics from Worcester Polytechnic Institute.&amp;nbsp; Masters and Doctorate (PhD) from NYU School of Engineering and Science.&lt;/p&gt;</p>

Ask SCORE
          Our veterinary practice began doing online marketing, including social media, about six
months ago. We believe it’s having a positive impact, but would like to know how we can
accurately measure its effectiveness.  

About the Author

       This column is brought to you by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of SCORE, with nearly
70 current and former business executives available to provide free, confidential, one-on-one
business mentoring and training workshops for area businesses. Call 603-666-7561 or visit
merrimackvalley.score.org for information on mentoring, upcoming workshops and volunteer

John Robert Knecht

John Robert Knecht

Current City: Rochester, MN

General:

All Business phases MMM&O---Money, Marketing, Management, and Operations. Was the CEO of a 153 employee multi level Building Material supply business which included the following: Home Building, Remodeling, General Contracting, Land Development, non-profit Development,  Modular Home manufacturing, Component Home parts manufacturer, truss manufacturer,Cash and Carry Building Supply business,  Real Estate company, Board member Black Hills Power & Light, Mobile home court developer, Real Estate Appraisal, numerous American Management Association short courses.

Political involvement: Lobbyist, RC City Council,  Governors Advisory Board for Mental Illness, Formed the RC Alliance for the Mentally Ill, Served on the SD Alliance for the Mentally Ill Board, Hospital Psychiatric Center advisory board, County commitment Board, Journey Museum Marketing Board, Elder and Trustee First Presbyterian Church, Junior Chamber, Chamber of Commerce, SCORE Chairman, Board member National Retail Lumber Dealers Assn., Board member National Home Builders Assn., Boy Scouts Cub Pack Master and Scout master, RC Economic Development Board, Board member West Hills Village 220 unit retirement facility, SBA Small Business Advisory Council, Elks Lodge, Chair of the RC Planning Commission, Board member of Northwestern Lumber Dealers Assn., Board member Pennington Drainage Commission, and a member of the Naja Temple Shrine.

Resume

Education

BS in Architectural Engineering, Life Insurance license,, Real Estate Appraisals, Real Estate License, Construction Management course. AMA courses: Marketing, Sensitivity 'training, Financial Management, Management of Managers, Management by Objective course, and Sales Management..

If you are passionate about improving your community or desire to make a difference in the world, then forming a nonprofit corporation could be the right choice for you. A nonprofit is just that—not for profit, which means any extra profit and income may not be divided up and distributed amongst members at the end of the fiscal year. While your nonprofit organization can most certainly have employees, all leftover revenue is meant to support the cause for which the nonprofit was formed. So if the nonprofit corporation had a net income at the end of the year of $100,000, it would pay federal and possibly state corporate income tax rates for that $100,000 because it has no shareholders for that profit to be distributed among. This is why many nonprofit corporations that have a tax-exempt purpose utilize a 501c3 designation with the IRS, becoming exempt from paying taxes on that $100,000, so they can keep as much of the money they collect as possible and use it to further their organizational purpose. 

When you decide to form a nonprofit, be aware that there are changing factors from state to state for nonprofit corporations. Each state is different and it is highly important that you contact the correct offices, obtain the right registrations, and make sure that you are operating in compliance with your state’s specific rules.

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

To many people, the idea of earning an income from a nonprofit organization seems absurd. However, many successful, tax-exempt nonprofits have paid staffs. Some nonprofits even offer executive salaries and benefit packages that rival those of big for-profit corporations. If this seems counterintuitive to you, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Below, we’ll take a closer look at how all this works. 

The Nonprofit Structure

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

A public benefit nonprofit corporation is what people think of when they think nonprofit.  It is a charity that is advantageous to the public at large, meaning that anyone could benefit from the actions of the nonprofit. 

What is a Public Benefit Nonprofit?

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

The relationship between your nonprofit and the state starts as soon as you file your articles of incorporation with the secretary of state, and continues on throughout the duration of your nonprofit’s life. Here are the ways in which your nonprofit corporation will need to interact with the state throughout its life.

Incorporation and filing

This is the very beginning of a nonprofit’s relationship with the state. It begins when you file your nonprofit’s formation documents with the secretary of state, or similar business division. After submitting your formation documents, the state will file them and then, in most cases, alert you that your nonprofit is registered with the state. The amount of time that it takes to file and process your nonprofit’s formation documents will vary by state.

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

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