Business Plans

Creating a Profit and Loss Statement

Summary

Creating A Profit and Loss Statement

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you with: develop a profit and loss statement for you company by implementing a single-step or multi-step formatted statement.

Pricing Products and Services

Summary

Pricing Products and Services

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you: develop correct pricing for your company's products and services using market research, pricing models, and other pricing techniques.

Protect Your Intellectual Property with Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you: identify ways to protect intellectual property in your company through patents, trademarks, and copyrights.

Conducting a Market Analysis

Summary

Conducting a Market Analysis

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you: identify ways your company can determine its market and conduct a market analysis.

Determing Your Company's Legal Structure

Summary

Determining Your Company's Legal Structure

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you: identify your company's legal structure.

Developing a Business Plan

Summary

This free online business workshop will help you: develop a successful business plan by providing a step-by-step guide of the components of a business plan.

 

Steve Strauss, founder of www.theselfemployed.com, makes the case for effective managerial skills as a tool for business success.

Q: Hi Steve – I have an idea for a business, but I also get that the startup landscape these days seems to be evolving rapidly – now it seems like it is all about social media and mobility and so on. That is not really my thing. So, do you think I can still make a go of it if my startup is more ‘old school’?

Vic

A:

Old school is old school for a reason: It usually has stood the test of time and works.

About the Author

Steve StraussSteven D. Strauss is a lawyer and writer and is one of the country's leading experts on small business as well as an international business speaker. The best-selling author of 17 books, his latest is the all-new 3rd ed. of The Small Business Bible. You can listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business Success Powered by Greatland, visit his new website for the self-employed, TheSelfEmployed, follow him on Twitter, and "like" TheSelfEmployed on Facebook. You can e-mail Steve at: sstrauss@mrallbiz.com. © Steven D. Strauss

Starting a small business is a smart, bold thing to do, regardless of the economic climate. The conventional wisdom may be to wait and kick off your venture when times are flush, credit is flowing, and consumers are eager, but there are actually a number of very convincing reasons why starting your business in a down economy can benefit you. Whether times are tough or not, though, before you get out of the starting gate and launch your venture there are several critical things you're going to need. To help make your journey easier and hopefully more prosperous, read on for the essentials.

1. A Good Idea

All successful small businesses start with a good idea - but how do you come up with one? Instead of using past methods of idea generation, like developing a product or service and then creating or establishing a foothold in a market, try the opposite approach. Identify a need or a desire that a large demographic of society currently has and build your idea around a solution.

2. Organization

About the Author

Kevin Glover operates a small business from home in Florida and writes about his experiences and advice related to marketing, startup costs, and financing.

If you are passionate about improving your community or desire to make a difference in the world, then forming a nonprofit corporation could be the right choice for you. A nonprofit is just that—not for profit, which means any extra profit and income may not be divided up and distributed amongst members at the end of the fiscal year. While your nonprofit organization can most certainly have employees, all leftover revenue is meant to support the cause for which the nonprofit was formed. So if the nonprofit corporation had a net income at the end of the year of $100,000, it would pay federal and possibly state corporate income tax rates for that $100,000 because it has no shareholders for that profit to be distributed among. This is why many nonprofit corporations that have a tax-exempt purpose utilize a 501c3 designation with the IRS, becoming exempt from paying taxes on that $100,000, so they can keep as much of the money they collect as possible and use it to further their organizational purpose. 

When you decide to form a nonprofit, be aware that there are changing factors from state to state for nonprofit corporations. Each state is different and it is highly important that you contact the correct offices, obtain the right registrations, and make sure that you are operating in compliance with your state’s specific rules. These steps below, however, will get those who are passionate about a cause either in their community or beyond on the right track to making a difference by way of a nonprofit corporation:

1.

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

To many people, the idea of earning an income from a nonprofit organization seems absurd. However, many successful, tax-exempt nonprofits have paid staffs. Some nonprofits even offer executive salaries and benefit packages that rival those of big for-profit corporations. If this seems counterintuitive to you, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Below, we’ll take a closer look at how all this works. 

The Nonprofit Structure

 

About the Author

Drake Forester, Chief Legal Strategiest - Northwest Registered AgentDrake Forester is the chief legal strategist at Northwest Registered Agent, LLC. Throughout his career, Drake has researched many complicated nonprofit compliance issues and provided whitepaper and publications for many leading nonprofit organizations in the United States.

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