Selling / Exiting

How operations management is carried out in any organization depends on the nature of products or services of the firm.  Retail, manufacturing, and wholesale each have different requirements, but all businesses can become more effective through business improvement engineering.

This flowchart example, is one step toward optimizing a shipping process.

 

       

       

Grand Strand SCORE Ranked Second in the USA

Date
Thu, 2009-03-19 (All day)
Norm Paige (right) presents the Award to Sam Bookhart, Chapter Chairman for 2008

March 19, 2009

Small businesses received the biggest reduction in their credit card processing charges in the history of the electronic payment industry. Most small businesses will not realize these savings unless they take action.

By Michael O'Hare, President, BlindBid, a small business cost reduction company

Small businesses received the biggest reduction in their credit card processing charges in the history of the electronic payment industry. Most small businesses will not realize these savings unless they take action.

It is not possible to sell a nonprofit business. By its nature, a nonprofit business is a charitable endeavor, managed by a board of supposedly disinterested citizens for the betterment of the community. A nonprofit business is not owned by any one individual or group of individuals. The IRS prohibits any board member or employee from receiving "profits" from a nonprofit organization. There are stiff penalties for doing so. That said, you can close down your nonprofit organization or consider transferring it to another Nonprofit.

By Sidney Kotzen, SCORE Business Accredited Counselor, Chapter 411, SCORE NE Mass

The most frequent recommendation made in counseling for those who desire to start a new business is you need a business plan. Although people flinch when they hear the words Business Plan it really does serve a critical purpose. The purpose of the business plan, first and foremost, is to test the feasibility of a business idea. If the final conclusion is that the plan does not look like it will lead to a success, it is better not to proceed.

By Paul Kopelcheck is the Past Board Chair of SCORE

1. Start Smart. Identify a niche. Don’t compete to be the lowest cost provider. Look for what makes your product or service unique and adds a special value for the client and charge for that value. Every business has many facets. Start with what you know and like; start a business that has meaning to you. Keep in mind that we don’t know what the future holds, many of the jobs and businesses of tomorrow don’t exist today. You can create your own success.

Helping small and middle size companies succeed is why the counselors at SCORE give their time and experience freely. It is what we do and letters like the one below is our reward.

By Jack Clauson, John Masone and Jim Lynam, SCORE Accredited Business Counselors, Chapter 411, Score NE Mass.

Helping small and middle size companies succeed is why the counselors at Score give their time and experience freely. It is what we do and letters like the one below is our reward. Here is a great example:

Dear Jack,

Syndicate content